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meltingblog:

© NemO’s
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adambatchelor:

New Entomology series now online.

"Created as a spin on entomology collections, insects pinned down into a black box frame for a lifetime of observation and appreciation. Drawn solely with coloured pencils these new drawings give a rare glimpse into the mating habits of these beautiful creatures."

You can buys prints from this series from Art Wednesday.
adambatchelor:

New Entomology series now online.

"Created as a spin on entomology collections, insects pinned down into a black box frame for a lifetime of observation and appreciation. Drawn solely with coloured pencils these new drawings give a rare glimpse into the mating habits of these beautiful creatures."

You can buys prints from this series from Art Wednesday.
adambatchelor:

New Entomology series now online.

"Created as a spin on entomology collections, insects pinned down into a black box frame for a lifetime of observation and appreciation. Drawn solely with coloured pencils these new drawings give a rare glimpse into the mating habits of these beautiful creatures."

You can buys prints from this series from Art Wednesday.
adambatchelor:

New Entomology series now online.

"Created as a spin on entomology collections, insects pinned down into a black box frame for a lifetime of observation and appreciation. Drawn solely with coloured pencils these new drawings give a rare glimpse into the mating habits of these beautiful creatures."

You can buys prints from this series from Art Wednesday.
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artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
artchipel:

Barry Underwood (b.1963, USA)
Artist Barry Underwood documents full-scale installations he builds on-site in the landscape. Curiosity about ecological and social history of specific places drives his work. By revealing the beauty and potential of an ordinary landscape an everyday scene is transformed into a memorable, visual experience. Each photograph image is a dialogue – the result of his direct encounter with nature and history. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. This tension between the familiar and the surreal gives the images a strange power.
[more Barry Underwood | artist found at myampgoesto11]
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martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
martinekenblog:

‘A colourful winter’ by photographer Florent Tanet comes right in time as winter finally hit Berlin, everything is grey and drab and we lack some playful colors. Inspired by a luxury comestibles boutique in the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris, Tanet arranged every day fruits and vegetables into graphic patterns, successively sculptures and still lives.
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vegan-art:

“My mother and I watch a pig escape the slaughterhouse”  |  Sue Coe
“We do not need any new morals for animals. We must merely stop arbitrarily excluding animals from our present morals.” ~Helmut Kaplan, German philosopher
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humptydumptyunbroken:

Half-human, half-animal grotesque sculptures by Liu Xue.

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humptydumptyunbroken:

Half-human, half-animal grotesque sculptures by Liu Xue.

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humptydumptyunbroken:

Half-human, half-animal grotesque sculptures by Liu Xue.

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humptydumptyunbroken:

Half-human, half-animal grotesque sculptures by Liu Xue.

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whimsebox:

Bizarre sculptures by Lydia Dekker
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art-and-fury:

Le Silence - Odilon Redon

(more)
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rfmmsd:

Artist & Sculptor:
Anna Gillespie
 “Taste the Rain”


"We have to learn to love nature, to acknowledge we are part of it. This calls for a new, co-operative spirit to replace the old, exploitative relationship, which was the corollary of feeling separate from nature. Even speaking of ‘nature’ as something distinct from the human race suggests an artificial separation. We are all part of the natural world. Collecting beech nuts and acorns for sculptures, made me realize that every one is the same and yet different…just like us. Nature is so prolific. 
"I feel I’ve got a long way to go personally in drawing closer to nature. Art for me is an approach to that, a way to fuse with where we have come from and what we rely on, what sustains us."
from:  Somerset Life


"Taste the Rain is part of an on going series of work using material that has fallen from trees: acorns, beechnut casings, leaves, bark, sycamore keys," she tells us. "For this piece, I found the bark in a wood near my home in the south west of England, from a fallen tree. All these works try to express a moment of connection to nature and this particular piece is about trying to draw the viewer into recalling what it feels like to stand out in the rain and engage their senses."
rfmmsd:

Artist & Sculptor:
Anna Gillespie
 “Taste the Rain”


"We have to learn to love nature, to acknowledge we are part of it. This calls for a new, co-operative spirit to replace the old, exploitative relationship, which was the corollary of feeling separate from nature. Even speaking of ‘nature’ as something distinct from the human race suggests an artificial separation. We are all part of the natural world. Collecting beech nuts and acorns for sculptures, made me realize that every one is the same and yet different…just like us. Nature is so prolific. 
"I feel I’ve got a long way to go personally in drawing closer to nature. Art for me is an approach to that, a way to fuse with where we have come from and what we rely on, what sustains us."
from:  Somerset Life


"Taste the Rain is part of an on going series of work using material that has fallen from trees: acorns, beechnut casings, leaves, bark, sycamore keys," she tells us. "For this piece, I found the bark in a wood near my home in the south west of England, from a fallen tree. All these works try to express a moment of connection to nature and this particular piece is about trying to draw the viewer into recalling what it feels like to stand out in the rain and engage their senses."
rfmmsd:

Artist & Sculptor:
Anna Gillespie
 “Taste the Rain”


"We have to learn to love nature, to acknowledge we are part of it. This calls for a new, co-operative spirit to replace the old, exploitative relationship, which was the corollary of feeling separate from nature. Even speaking of ‘nature’ as something distinct from the human race suggests an artificial separation. We are all part of the natural world. Collecting beech nuts and acorns for sculptures, made me realize that every one is the same and yet different…just like us. Nature is so prolific. 
"I feel I’ve got a long way to go personally in drawing closer to nature. Art for me is an approach to that, a way to fuse with where we have come from and what we rely on, what sustains us."
from:  Somerset Life


"Taste the Rain is part of an on going series of work using material that has fallen from trees: acorns, beechnut casings, leaves, bark, sycamore keys," she tells us. "For this piece, I found the bark in a wood near my home in the south west of England, from a fallen tree. All these works try to express a moment of connection to nature and this particular piece is about trying to draw the viewer into recalling what it feels like to stand out in the rain and engage their senses."
rfmmsd:

Artist & Sculptor:
Anna Gillespie
 “Taste the Rain”


"We have to learn to love nature, to acknowledge we are part of it. This calls for a new, co-operative spirit to replace the old, exploitative relationship, which was the corollary of feeling separate from nature. Even speaking of ‘nature’ as something distinct from the human race suggests an artificial separation. We are all part of the natural world. Collecting beech nuts and acorns for sculptures, made me realize that every one is the same and yet different…just like us. Nature is so prolific. 
"I feel I’ve got a long way to go personally in drawing closer to nature. Art for me is an approach to that, a way to fuse with where we have come from and what we rely on, what sustains us."
from:  Somerset Life


"Taste the Rain is part of an on going series of work using material that has fallen from trees: acorns, beechnut casings, leaves, bark, sycamore keys," she tells us. "For this piece, I found the bark in a wood near my home in the south west of England, from a fallen tree. All these works try to express a moment of connection to nature and this particular piece is about trying to draw the viewer into recalling what it feels like to stand out in the rain and engage their senses."
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